Summary: Sixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight. Now Simon is actually being blackmailed: if he doesn’t play wingman for class clown Martin, his sexual identity will become everyone’s business. Worse, the privacy of Blue, the pen name of the boy he’s been emailing, will be compromised.

With some messy dynamics emerging in his once tight-knit group of friends, and his email correspondence with Blue growing more flirtatious every day, Simon’s junior year has suddenly gotten all kinds of complicated. Now, change-averse Simon has to find a way to step out of his comfort zone before he’s pushed out—without alienating his friends, compromising himself, or fumbling a shot at happiness with the most confusing, adorable guy he’s never met. [Goodreads]

I finished this book exactly four minutes ago, and I’m still smiling. One of my many bookish goals this year is to read more diverse books featuring more diverse characters. There’s too much of the same stuff out there. So, Simon was exactly what I was hoping for. I cannot stress enough how much I loved this book. I’ve been reading it for a few days because I’ve been busy with other stuff and haven’t had a lot of time, but my mom gave me this to read (thanks, mom!) and I’ve heard good things about Becky Albertalli, so I gave it a shot. AND OH MY, I am so freaking in love with this book. Please don’t make me give it back to the library. I don’t want to part with it.

I could probably just gush vaguely about the whole book and everything about it, but it might be helpful if I tell you what I liked (besides everything, because I’ve already said that like four times). Simon was a phenomenal character in my opinion, really funny, sweet, and he just told his story in the greatest way. He loves Oreos with a burning passion (same), he is apparently great at pulling off eyeliner (I, however, can not), and he is so freaking cute as he tells this story. The whole blackmail thing made me feel a little sick to my stomach, just because I loved Simon as a character so much it basically physically pained me to read about him being upset. Becky Albertalli is doing something right, that’s for sure. Not only did she create beautiful characters, but the plot was so layered and detailed that you weren’t bored for a second (I obviously really love this book, okay?). People have said that they had guesses as to who Blue was, but I am honestly so bad at guessing games that I just read super fast so I wouldn’t be in the dark for a long time. There’s the problem of the blackmailer, the question of who Blue is, issues with Simon’s friends, and on top of all that, the stress of coming out. The whole story was balanced in a way that it was the right amount of overwhelming and sweet. I know I’m still gushing. Sorryyyy.

Wrapping this up, I was really happy with the ending. With some stories like this, you find out who the secret person is and then it’s over (disappointing). However, Simon gives you the ultimate ending, complete with everything I could’ve wanted as a reader (I appreciate a solid ending, thankyouverymuch). I had a lot of fun reading this book, and I would completely recommend it to anyone. Need more diverse lit? This book. Need a fun book? This book. THIS. BOOK.

Rating: Is 6 stars an acceptable rating for a five point scale??

Favorite Quote: “Why is straight the default? Everyone should have to declare one way or another, and it shouldn’t be this big awkward thing whether you’re straight, gay, bi, or whatever. I’m just saying.”

 

4 Comments

  1. I loved this book as well, but I am wondering what you thought of the bad language? Did you think it was organic to the story, as in this is how high schoolers speak, or did you think it was a bit excessive?

    Like

  2. I do think that the language is a bit much for middle schoolers. This is, however, mostly how high schoolers talk (sadly, everyone uses a lot of inappropriate words) so I was used to it

    Like

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